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Open Access April 29, 2024 Endnote/Zotero/Mendeley (RIS) BibTeX

Predictors of Patient Outcomes Associated with Transfer Status to Definitive Care Hospitals: A Study of Admitted Road Traffic Injured Patients in Two Major Trauma Hospitals in The Gambia

Abstract The Gambia uses the Primary Health Care model with no trauma response system. Trauma patients are transferred through multiple levels of health care facilities before definitive care hospitals. This study was conducted to identify predictors of injury factors associated with transfer. In this study, we examined characteristics of transferred patients compared to those directly admitted in [...] Read more.
The Gambia uses the Primary Health Care model with no trauma response system. Trauma patients are transferred through multiple levels of health care facilities before definitive care hospitals. This study was conducted to identify predictors of injury factors associated with transfer. In this study, we examined characteristics of transferred patients compared to those directly admitted in definitive care hospitals. The study was conducted in two major trauma hospitals in The Gambia. 251 road traffic injury (RTI) patients were either transferred (84%) from lower-level health centers or directly admitted (16%) to one of the study hospitals. Transferred patients were more likely to have been pedestrian/bicyclists (aOR = 1.81; 95% CI = 0.86 – 3.80). Administration of antibiotics was significantly associated with direct admit than transferred patients (aOR = 6.84; 95% CI = 2.38 – 19.68). Transferred patients were more likely to receive intravenous fluid compared to direct admits (aOR = 0.03; 95% CI = 0.01 – 0.08). The study results have implications for policies and planning in the healthcare setting in The Gambia and other LMICs with similar settings. Based on the findings of this study, it is essential that hospital management teams adapt to increasing reliance of RTI patients on lower-level healthcare facilities. The study results suggest increased burden on lower-level health care facilities. Efforts and resources should focus more on supporting lower-level facilities.
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Open Access September 20, 2023 Endnote/Zotero/Mendeley (RIS) BibTeX

Group-specific Differences in Blood Lead Levels among Occupationally Exposed Workers in Greater Banjul Area, The Gambia

Abstract Occupational lead (Pb) exposure continues to be an important public health problem globally, yet data is lacking on the associated risks and resources available for the prevention of Pb related diseases in low middle income countries (LMICs) like The Gambia. In this study, we used a case-control design to compare blood lead levels (BLLs) between the exposed (auto repair workers) and unexposed [...] Read more.
Occupational lead (Pb) exposure continues to be an important public health problem globally, yet data is lacking on the associated risks and resources available for the prevention of Pb related diseases in low middle income countries (LMICs) like The Gambia. In this study, we used a case-control design to compare blood lead levels (BLLs) between the exposed (auto repair workers) and unexposed (healthcare workers) populations in The Greater Banjul Area. The data was analyzed using Chi square test of independence to determine the characteristic factors associated with BLL. Multivariate logistic regression was used to test the relationship between BLLs for auto repair and healthcare workers and their experiences. The results of this study indicated 82.1% of cases had higher BLLs compared to 52.9% of controls. Also, the proportion of workers with elevated BLLs was higher for certain factors including more than 80% of those with greater than 10 of years job experience, more than 70% of those who worked greater than 5 days a week, worked more than 8 hours per day, did not use personal protective equipment (PPE), were illiterate or had no formal education, and smoked or ate at work. The study results have implications for policies and practice in the auto repair industry and related workplaces in The Gambia and other LMICs with similar settings. Based on the findings of this study, it is essential to initiate discussions to establish national occupational health policies in The Gambia aimed at protecting workers and the general population.
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Keyword:  Edrisa Sanyang
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