Filter options

Publication Date
From
to
Subjects

Journals


Article Types

Countries / Territories
Open Access June 04, 2022 Endnote/Zotero/Mendeley (RIS) BibTeX

Women’s socio-demographic and cultural factors influencing unmet need for family planning in rural areas of The Gambia: Evidence from a population-based analytical cross-sectional study

Abstract Background: Reproductive health is a critical component of overall health and development. Unmet contraceptive needs are one of the regularly cited measures of the efficacy of family planning (FP) initiatives. This study set out to determine the magnitude and associated factors of unmet need for FP among women of reproductive-aged (15-49 years) in the provincial areas of The Gambia. [...] Read more.
Background: Reproductive health is a critical component of overall health and development. Unmet contraceptive needs are one of the regularly cited measures of the efficacy of family planning (FP) initiatives. This study set out to determine the magnitude and associated factors of unmet need for FP among women of reproductive-aged (15-49 years) in the provincial areas of The Gambia. Methods: The study used a community-based cross-sectional analytical design. A multistage sampling strategy, comprising simple random and cluster sampling, was utilized to obtain a sample of 643 childbearing women (15-49 years) from rural Gambia's sampled clusters. Data collection was conducted using pre-tested structured interview questionnaires. The association was examined using chi-square/fisher's exact test with a significance level of p<0.05. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the effect of sociodemographic and cultural determinants on unmet FP need, with corresponding computed adjusted odds ratios (aOR). IBM SPSS version 24 was used for data entry and analysis. Results: The unmet need for FP among the study participants was 25.2%; unmet need for spacing and unmet need for limiting was 17.4% and 7.8%, respectively. The total demand for FP was 59.4%, while the satisfaction of demand for FP was 57.6%. The significant predictors of unmet need for FP were woman’s age at first pregnancy (aOR=0.899, p=0.033), LGA of origin (aOR=0.240, p=0.001) and frequency of using contraceptives (aOR=1.587, p=0.032). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a high unmet need for FP among rural women in The Gambia, with the most often cited reason for non-use being fear of side effects. Hence, it is necessary to concentrate FP services for rural populations, stressing education regarding contraceptive side effects, service quality, and gender equality. Additionally, the study suggests that male participation and religious leaders' involvement in FP programs be strengthened and mainstreamed, as well as the establishment of a communication program that specifically promotes inter-spousal communication.
Figures
PreviousNext
Research Article
Open Access May 22, 2022 Endnote/Zotero/Mendeley (RIS) BibTeX

Prevalence and predictors of physical activity among female high school students in The Gambia: an institutional-based cross-sectional study

Abstract Background: Everyone, irrespective of age, sex, colour, ethnicity, or present overall fitness level, can benefit from regular exercise. To improve one's health, one must engage in regular physical activity. People with underlying illnesses like long-term impairment can benefit from regular physical activity at the individual level, especially young women. Thus, the current study aimed to [...] Read more.
Background: Everyone, irrespective of age, sex, colour, ethnicity, or present overall fitness level, can benefit from regular exercise. To improve one's health, one must engage in regular physical activity. People with underlying illnesses like long-term impairment can benefit from regular physical activity at the individual level, especially young women. Thus, the current study aimed to assess the prevalence and determinants of physical activity among female school-aged adolescents in the West Coast Region of The Gambia. Methods: The present study used an institutional-based cross-sectional analytical study to collect quantitative data from 384 female high school students in The Gambia. The study used a content-validated, pretested structured questionnaire that consisted of both open and closed-ended questions on physical activity. The data were processed and analyzed using IBM SPSS version 26.0. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square and/or Fisher exact test were used with a p-value <0.15 for inclusion in the logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, while p-value <0.05 was considered for statistical significance. Results: The proportion of female students involved in physical activity was 37.5%. The mean age of students was 18.8 years with a standard deviation of 1.7 years. Factors such as female students between 17 – 20 years (aOR:3.05, 95% C.I. (1.807 – 5.138)), father never been to school (aOR: 2.82, 95% C.I. (1.495 – 5.334)), primary education (aOR: 2.15, 95% C.I. (1.027 – 4.493)), upper basic school (aOR: 2.31, 95% C.I. (1.055 – 5.074)) and science major students (aOR: 2.21, 95% C.I. (1.203 – 4.047)) had increased odds of involving in PA. Furthermore, students who knew that exercise would strengthen bones (aOR: 2.62, 95% C.I (1.444 – 4.739)), do a planned brisk walking (aOR: 19.16, 95% C.I. (6.698 – 54.811)), basketball/football (aOR: 29.76, 95% C.I. (10.004 – 88.512)) and skipping with rope (aOR: 29.15, 95% C.I. (9.726 – 87.333)) had increased odds to involved in PA after controlling for confounders. Other factors such as students whose mother never been to school (aOR: 0.31, 95% C.I. (0.140 – 0.674)), primary level (aOR: 0.25, 95% C.I. (0.123 – 0.518)), senior secondary level (aOR: 0.42, 95% C.I. (0.189 – 0.935)), nuclear family (aOR: 0.23, 95% C.I. (0.119 – 0.458)) and extended family (aOR: 0.45, 95% C.I. (0.225 – 0.915)) had reduced odds of involving in PA. Conclusion: There is low physical activity among female adolescents in schools. For this, it is imperative that suitable interventions be implemented to raise the level of physical activity among secondary school students. A future intervention for school-aged adolescents could benefit from these findings.
Figures
PreviousNext
Research Article
Open Access May 22, 2022 Endnote/Zotero/Mendeley (RIS) BibTeX

Pooled prevalence and contextual determinants of contraceptive utilization among reproductive-age women in The Gambia: Evidence from 2013 – 2020 Demographic Health Surveys

Abstract Background: Family planning (FP) methods have been found as an efficient approach of reducing fertility and are therefore widely supported in order to decrease population growth, particularly in poor nations. Promoting contraception availability among women (15 – 49) age has also been shown to be an efficient public health strategy for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. This [...] Read more.
Background: Family planning (FP) methods have been found as an efficient approach of reducing fertility and are therefore widely supported in order to decrease population growth, particularly in poor nations. Promoting contraception availability among women (15 – 49) age has also been shown to be an efficient public health strategy for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. This paper aimed at exploring the pooled prevalence of contraceptive uptake and its contextual determinants among women of childbearing age in The Gambia. Methods: The Gambia Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS) in both 2013 and 2019-20 was used for this study. Data were obtained from a pooled 22,098 women aged 15-49 (10,233 for 2013 and 11,865 for 2019-20) through a stratified two-stage cluster sampling approach. Percentages and chi-square tests were used and variables with p-value <0.05 were included into the model. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the predictors of contraceptive usage at 95% confidence interval (CIs) with computed adjusted odds ratios (aORs). All the study data were analyzed using Stata version 15. Results: The weighted pooled prevalence of modern contraceptive utilization in The Gambia was 10.1%. Younger age, compared with women aged 25-29; 30-34; 35-39; 40-44; primary education (aOR=1.25, 95% CI=1.05-1.49); secondary education (aOR=1.57, 95% CI= 1.32-1.85); Higher education (aOR=1.90, 95% CI=1.34-12.69); living in urban areas (aOR=1.49, 95% CI= 1.25-1.79); parity 2-4 (aOR=1.21, 95% CI= 1.01-1.47); told about FP at health facility (aOR=2.97, 95% CI= 2.61-3.38), and no desire for many children (aOR=1.96, 95% CI= 1.62-2.37) were more like to use modern contraceptives among Gambian women. Conclusion: The programme certainly needs to consider improvements in the quality of care being offered to acceptors. Government agencies should target these programs and campaigns on regional FP demands and provide suitable culturally sensitive and regionally adaptive services to the communities' contexts. The programme should intensify its efforts in rural and urban settings to improve accessibility to and availability of FP services.
Figures
PreviousNext
Research Article
Open Access May 21, 2022 Endnote/Zotero/Mendeley (RIS) BibTeX

State of knowledge and challenges in the control and eradication of Onchocerciasis in Africa: a mini scoping review

Abstract Background: Onchocerciasis is a vector-borne neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused by the filarial worm Onchocerca volvulus. Given the high morbidity and mortality, onchocerciasis control gained great attention from many stakeholders both nationally and internationally. However, there are still the need for further solidified commitments and compelling initiatives across concerned [...] Read more.
Background: Onchocerciasis is a vector-borne neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused by the filarial worm Onchocerca volvulus. Given the high morbidity and mortality, onchocerciasis control gained great attention from many stakeholders both nationally and internationally. However, there are still the need for further solidified commitments and compelling initiatives across concerned stakeholders including regional bodies in the fight toward controlling its burden and risks. Thus, this review briefly appraised the current understanding and dynamics in the control and eradication efforts of Onchocerciasis in Africa. Methods: A rapid scoping review was used for this paper. Key databases used for this study include Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed and Google Scholar to identify a series of relevant peer-reviewed publications. The search contained just English-language articles. In addition, African government websites and specialized organizations such as WHO, UNAIDS, CDC, etc. were accessed and reviewed to gather important data on national and international control programs, related documentation and consultative expert reports. Results: In Africa, long-standing strides toward the control and elimination measures for onchocerciasis were conducted for several decades. Between 1974 to 2002, OCP had actively led the control and containment efforts for onchocerciasis in the context of 11 West Africa. However, endemic regions and states have switched their policies from controlling to eradication, with the ultimate objective of preventing their territories from parasite spread. Some key challenges are the insufficient identification of all endemic areas, high prevalence of both onchocerciasis and loiasis, potential development of resistance to ivermectin, inconsistent initiatives to address cross-border problems, disagreements and social disturbance. Various challenges, however, impede current efforts to eradicate African onchocerciasis. Conclusion: In the last decades, extensive measures have been taken with specialized state programs, largely efficient in high endemic nations, to manage and control onchocerciasis in African regions. The implications of these and other difficulties at country level control programs must therefore be identified and country-specific contextual remedies used to expedite the elimination of onchocerciasis.
Mini Review

Query parameters

Keyword:  Amadou Barrow

Citations of

Views of

Downloads of